Best Western Premier Queen Hotel and Kings’ Suites

Book now (price from £74.00)

Address: City Road, Chester, CH1 3AF, United Kingdom

Star rating:
4 star hotel

4.7

The best of both worlds: an imposing old railway hotel, with ultra modern suites attached.

Don’t be fooled by the Queen of Chester: look past the Best Western branding (which I always associate with basic American motels); don’t linger on the rather odd statues in the gardens as you walk past; and certainly don’t do what I did on first impression, and dismiss it as a faded lady of the city. The Queen Hotel and Kings' Suites is a striking blend of new and old, with the best outside space of any hotel in Chester city centre. I also love that Chester itself makes a constant guest appearance, with lots of Romanesque booty on display (the gladiators in the corridors belong to the Grosvenor Museum). The owner’s passion for quirky art is also evident everywhere – some of it fabulous, some of it eyebrow-raising - terrace turtles or mosaic toilets by the lifts anyone?

Location
4
90%
Eating/drinking
4.5
90%
Leisure facilities
n/a
90%
Service
4.4
90%
Value for money
4.4
90%
Bedrooms
4.4
90%
Public areas
4.7
90%

Location

Opposite the entrance to the train station, so ideal for anyone arriving via the rails. It’s a 10-minute walk to the city centre. I’d avoid the subways that connect City Road to the city itself, especially at night – there are overground alternatives.

Bedrooms

From the traditional Victorian air of the Queen Hotel, to the recent addition of the Kings’ Suites, where you’ll find slick but comfortable bedrooms (warm colours and suede as opposed to the all-white décor one would normally label “slick”), there’s something for everyone. It’s a £30 upgrade to stay in the two-year-old suites – I think it’s worth every penny, but, if you’re more of a traditionalist, stick with the Queen.

In the Kings’, each suite is dedicated to a king of a nation (which king and which nation depends on the floor you’re on – they include Russian, Italian, English and French). Standards include iPod docks and CD players. I like the multitude of mirrors and the framed information on your particular king (plus his imposing portrait over the bed).

The rooms in the Queen Hotel offer similar standards, like Gilchrist and Soames bathroom goodies, a CD player, plasma screen TVs and a teddy on every bed.

Public areas

I’m a big fan of the main Italian-style terrace on a sunny day. The owner’s art is on display again here (I’m not kidding when I say there’s a giant stone turtle), there’s also a waterfall, a colossal chess set and ample seating. The Albert Lounge, at the front of the hotel, is in keeping with a Victorian railway hotel: large oil paintings, dark leather, heavy drapes – plus a few business meetings during the day.

Eating and drinking

The Bacchus Restaurant is where you’ll find breakfast and dinner and Afternoon Tea can be taken in the Albert Lounge. The King’s Quarters, another restaurant under the Kings’ Suites, also offers dinner on selected evenings with cool live music to whet the appetite. No kids are allowed after 7.30pm. A range of decent cocktails and beers are served in the Waiting Room bar, though I prefer the hushed ambience of the Albert Lounge to take my drink.

Service

Young, pleasant and smartly uniformed staff are happy to help.

Who stays there

Business guests outweigh leisure visitors mid-week, but at the weekends the hotel is all about the city break. Lots of UK guests, plus Americans and Japanese.

Price advice

It's £30 extra to stay in the Kings’. Parking costs £10 for 24 hours.

Amenities

Recommended for

  • Couples
  • Families with teenagers
  • Families with younger children
  • Foodies
  • Honeymooners
  • Romance

Pros & Cons

  • The best outdoor space in city centre
  • The mix of old and new
  • Proximity to the railway station
  • Not a pretty walk to the city centre
  • Cost of parking
Book now (price from £74.00)