Linos Inn

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Address: Palea Kakopetria 34, 2810 Kakopetria, Cyprus

Star rating:
3 star hotel

4.1

A romantic if quirky restoration inn of interlinked 19th-century dwellings.

The Linos Inn, initially run by Stelios Alkiviades and his sister, opened in 1997. I’ve watched it grow, and grow, and grow, from just a handful of units to 31, in both the original building and in outlying ones, preserving original architectural details where possible. The name comes from the ancient wine presses which were a feature of the original houses.

Location
4.2
90%
Eating/drinking
4.1
90%
Leisure facilities
3.7
90%
Service
3.9
90%
Value for money
3.7
90%
Bedrooms
4.3
90%
Public areas
4
90%

Location

Linos Inn lies at the very centre of the listed old quarter of Kakopetria, the highest village of the Solea region in the Troödos foothills. The stream which divides Kakopetria is always within earshot, if not always in sight, of the balconies at the better-placed units.

Bedrooms

Both standard doubles and suites are sub-categorised depending on the presence or absence of jacuzzi tubs, fireplaces, or full kitchens, though all have dark-wood furniture and stone floors underfoot. Some fireplaces reportedly do not draw well (supplement charged for firewood). River-view studios have terraces and a fireplace, let down only by dated chartreuse bath fittings. In the main building, the “executive” suite is actually a 1-bedroom apartment with a fully fitted kitchen, a sitting room with fireplace and sofa-bed (for small children), a four-poster bed for parents and a proper tub and butler sink (non-chartreuse) in the bath. There’s also a 6-room annexe, the Hani Protopapa, with pool and its own breakfast service,  in the nearby village of Temvria.

Public areas

Tucked away in various corners and at various levels of this Tardis-like old warren are a bar (live guitar/bouzouki music at weekends), plus basement and courtyard seating for the restaurant. Next door, the Linos Pottery features the distinctive work of a local artist. Sadly, the affiliated, atmospheric Mesostrato restaurant down the street has closed for now. WiFi signal is available across the premises.

Eating and drinking

Fortunately, much of Mesostrato’s traditional Cypriot menu has been incorporated into the hotel’s. Main meals here get better marks than breakfast, and it’s probably best to go meze format than a la carte – allow 17 euros each plus 3 euros cover whenever live music is laid on.

Leisure facilities

There is only a sauna at present. A functions room is to be added soon.

Service

Generally willing, though not much local feel as most staff are currently from central Europe.

Who stays there

Overwhelmingly young Cypriot clientele here for “romantic” weekends, but also British, Israeli, French and Russian visitors.

 

Price advice

Weekends are predictably very busy with Cypriots, especially between August and April; August and Christmas/New Years attract supplements. At other seasons/days you’ll get a better deal. Check final bills carefully – there have been murmurings of “creative” addition.

Amenities

  • High-Speed Internet
  • Restaurant
  • Swimming Pool

Recommended for

  • Couples
  • Culture vultures
  • Families with younger children
  • Honeymooners
  • Stag / hen parties
  • Great views / scenery
  • Romance
  • Special occasions
  • Sightseeing
  • Design and architecture

Pros & Cons

  • Imaginative restoration
  • Bags of atmosphere
  • Poor soundproofing between certain studios
  • Long walk in from the closest parking
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