Sulovske Skaly: the "rock city" of Slovakia

By Jill Phillip, a Travel Enthusiast

Read more on Slovakia.

Overall rating:4.0 out of 5 (based on 2 votes)
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Recommended for:
Activity, Eco, Adventure, Budget

Climb, hike and cycle among the rock towers, gorges and ravines of this beautiful but unknown part of Slovakia - but hurry before everyone else discovers Sulovske Skaly too

It was hot and dusty and, as we jumped from the train, I half-expected some Henry Fondaesque assassin to ambush us at the isolated junction. But we were in Slovakia not the Wild West and Branko, our in-house translator, assured us, correctly, that the next train would arrive in five minutes.

Slovakian trains (www.slovakrail.sk) may be crowded and functional, but they are regular, cheap and punctual and 30 minutes later we gasped in collective amazement at the spectacular rock formations straight in front of us as we finally arrived in Sulovske Skaly (www.sulov.com) a “rock city” made up of contorted slabs of limestone around two hours north west of Bratislava.

Indeed, the journey itself was a major part of the adventure for our disparate gang of hikers and climbers, off on their annual quest for warm rock, challenging hikes and decent coffee, at minimal cost in currency and carbon. None of us knew anything about our destination, but Branko - multilingual, Central European expert and survivor of our basic, wet weekends in the Lakes and Wales - convinced us he could come up with something special.

Even for those able to differentiate their Slovakias from their Slovenias, this region remains undiscovered. Lower in altitude than the better-known Tatras to the north-east, its rock towers, needles, windows and gates, separated by deep waterless gorges and ravines, form a national nature reserve, deservedly popular with Slovakian walkers and climbers. Its forested and round-topped limestone ridges are also much more typical of Slovakia’s mountains than the Tatras, but you’ll find little tourist infrastructure and few English speakers.

Our base, Penzion Sulov, was an attractive self-catered, wooden chalet, equipped with hot showers, comfortable double bedrooms and even a tennis court, and represented amazing value at a week’s cost of only 70 euros each, particularly as it also boasted satellite TV and more than enough space to store and dry the plethora of equipment needed for a hiking/climbing holiday. Situated only five minutes' walk from the starting point of the climbs and hiking routes, this accessibility put it in a class of its own: no driving hassle or petrol costs, simply get your kit and walk out the door.

The hiking trails offered something for everyone, with expertly-marked paths, colour-coded for difficulty levels ranging from gentle rambles to strenuous hikes. Although elevations peaked at around 800m, some ascents were steep and, with handrails and ladders in strategic points, hikes often resembled via ferratas.

But, with spectacular views from the highest ridges, plus outstanding rock features, castle ruins and a relatively unspoilt ecosystem, this region offered many of the best elements of hiking, concentrated in a compact area easily reached by foot or cycle.

Make sure you visit the 13 metre high Goticka brana (Gothic Gate) rock formation, admire the views from the ruins of Sulovsky hrad (castle) and see the Sulovsky vodopad (waterfall).

During the last 20 years, the Sulov area has developed into something of a paradise for climbers and, today, it is regarded as one of the most interesting areas in Central Europe. For our rock fiends the climbing proved to be a revelation, surprising even the veterans with the quality of the bolting and testing grades on the often bizarre-shaped rocks. And, uniquely, we were the only Brits, as apart from a lone American, our fellow climbers were exclusively Slovakian.

The Súľov rocks are famous for a remarkable collection of plant species, including some very rare orchids. In general the region, although rural, is relatively uncultivated, resulting in delightful meadows of pastel-coloured wildflowers. We didn’t manage to meet the resident lynx, but the forests echoed to the clatter of noisy, brightly coloured birds, while surreal looking butterflies and cleverly camouflaged leaf frogs remained unperturbed by our presence.

Around a mile away was the hamlet of Sulov, with its brightly painted houses and attractive old church. Its small general store supplied us with enough provisions for the first couple of days and the family from the small bar in the village centre went out of their way to cook us a hearty Slovakian dinner of gulas (goulash) and bryndzove halusky (potato gnocchi) on our first night. But this is an area not yet geared up for tourism. Bars and cafés, although welcoming, were thin on the ground and did not routinely offer meals without prior notice. Coffee was, however, universally excellent.

We self-catered and, from outside the chalet, there was a fairly regular bus service to the nearest town, Bytca. Slovakian buses (www.busy.sk), like their rail counterparts, are clean and punctual, if rather basic. Towns in this area tend to be an odd mixture of some ornate traditional buildings, interspersed with bleak blocks of Stalinesque flats, along with some pioneer outposts of McDonald's and Tesco.

Bytca offered little for foodies, but Branko did lead us to one gem: Expresso-Jadran (Micurova, 369/8, 01401 Bytca), a small, unprepossessing café near the bus station. Owned by Branko’s fellow Bosnian, Kurtovic Hasan, a refugee from the civil war of the 1990s, it offered a bewildering range of delicious home-made ice cream and some seriously scrumptious pastries, particularly a mouth-watering sour cherry strudel, to accompany its strong, heady espressos.

If you want a cheap, peaceful, safe holiday with a range of outdoor activities for all ages right outside your door, in a beautiful, undiscovered, part of Europe, then visit Sulovske Skaly before everyone else does. Don’t go if you need wall-to-wall tourist infrastructure, upmarket restaurants, clubs and bars, fast food and western consumerism.

How to get there

Sulovske Skaly may be unsung, but it’s easily reached. Forget the “budgets” (with activity kit, you’ll easily exceed the baggage restrictions) and consider flying scheduled to Vienna (www.ba.com Heathrow to Vienna from £140) then taking one of the regular buses to Bratislava: journey time is 45 minutes, use www.viennaairport.com for details.

Better still, take the train (www.seat61.com for info on rail travel throughout Europe). Slovakia, nestling cosily between Vienna and Budapest, by rail is a breeze, more civilised and, with group bookings and unrestricted luggage, can be better value.

http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en&tab=wl&q=sulov%2C%20slovakia 

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More information on Sulovske Skaly: the "rock city" of Slovakia:

Author:
Jill Phillip
Traveller type:
Travel Enthusiast
Guide rating:
4
Average: 4 (2 votes)
Total views:
535
First uploaded:
22 February 2010
Last updated:
4 years 27 weeks 1 day 15 hours 38 min 36 sec ago
Destinations featured:
Trip types:
Activity, Adventure, Eco
Budget level:
Budget
Free tags / Keywords:
hiking, cycling, climbing

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(out of 5)
1. Penzion Sulov
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Community comments (4)

Rating:
4
0 of 0 people found the following comment helpful.

Sounds great. I really enjoy reading the guides about places reachable but less known.

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Thanks Jon. We were fortunate in benefiting from an "insider's" knowledge of the region, otherwise it is doubtful we would have found out about it. If anyone is interested in going there, I can provide further details of trains/buses.
A great area to photograph too.
Jill

Rating:
4
0 of 0 people found the following comment helpful.

Thank you for an interesting guide and for introducing me to Sulovske Skaly, Jill. I am sure that our rock climbing and hiking readers will want to discover Sulovske Skaly for themselves after reading this. You have a lovely friendly writing style and your personal introduction grabbed my attention.

A few small points...it would be great if you could add in a few sub-heads to break up your text slightly. Also, is Expresso-Jadran meant to be Espresso-Jadran? I have left it for now as I wasn't sure. Thanks.

What do other readers think of this guide? Has it inspired you to don your walking boots and book a flight to Slovakia? Thanks.

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Many thanks for those kind words Cathy. I have double checked Expresso-Jadran and the rest of the spellings and all are correct!
We all loved our stay in Sulov and are certain other climbers/walkers/cyclists etc will do so too.
Jill