A Scottish adventure around every corner

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By Jenny McNeely, a Travel Professional

Read more on Scotland.

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Stroll across the cliffs of Skye, savour the seafood in a scenic fishing village and sip single-malt whisky in Glen Coe. Scotland in a campervan has all the ingredients for the ultimate road trip

When you explore Scotland in a campervan the journey becomes as important as the destination. It is most rewarding to avoid the tourist routes and go your own way. Here are some recommended routes off the beaten track to get your motor running.

Coastal path
The East Neuk of Fife is a charming corner of Scotland within easy reach of Edinburgh, making this a good route if you have just a few days to spare. Start from St Andrews and motor down through the tiny fishing villages along the coast. Crail, Anstruther, Elie, Pittenweem and St Monans all have their charms and invite relaxed exploration.

The Anstruther Fish Bar (www.anstrutherfishbar.co.uk/) serves legendary fish and chips making it an ideal pit-stop. There are plenty of coastal walks to stretch your legs or, if the sun is shining, take a dip in the tidal swimming pool at St MonansGrangemuir Woodland Park (01333 450314, www.caravancampingsites.co.uk/fife/grangemuir.htm) is a secluded and lovely campsite set in the grounds of a former estate and located a mile outside of Pittenweem.

Road To The Isles
Taking a scenic route is unavoidable in Scotland. If you plan to travel to some of the beautiful islands take the A830 from Fort William to the ferry port of Mallaig – poetically known as The Road To The Isles. This is a gorgeous drive with the added benefit of a great campsite just a few miles outside of Mallaig.

Camusdarach campsite (01687 450221, www.road-to-the-isles.org.uk/camusdarach) is a sheltered, well-kept secret just a few minutes walk from the silver sands of Morar. Film buffs may recognise it as Ben’s Beach from the cult film Local Hero. Stop off for a night here before your morning ferry ( www.calmac.co.uk) and enjoy stunning sunsets and island views from the beach.

Skye-bound
Skye is a great camper destination with secluded beaches and some of the best walking in Scotland.

The dreaded midge fly has sabotaged many a Skye holiday so buy some Avon Skin So Soft cream en-route and smother yourself regularly. Or eat a lot of garlic, or stay in the bar.

Skye is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Scotland but it is easy to give the crowds the slip in your campervan. Glenbrittle Campsite (01478 640404) on the shores of Loch Brittle and the foot of the Cuillin Hills is a great base if you want to explore the hills. Or unfold your deckchair, get your book out and enjoy the views over Loch Brittle.

Further north, Uig is the ferry port to the remote Western Isles - ideal for a far-flung camper adventure. Otherwise continue round this northernmost point where you will find the Skye Museum of Island Life (http://www.skyemuseum.co.uk/) The painstaking reconstructions offer poignant insight into Skye’s not-so-distant crofting past. 

The weird and wonderful rock formations of the Quiraing dominant the landscape of north-east Skye so take time to explore before reaching the tamer landscapes toward Portree.

Skye is connected to the Scottish mainland by the Skye Bridge. An alternative route off the island is on the dinky turntable ferry from Glenelg to Kylerhea (www.skyeferry.co.uk/). There is an otter sanctuary here so keep an close watch for the elusive creatures.

Greatest of glens
The route through Glen Coe is one of the most breathtaking in Scotland. Despite one too many tour buses it should not be missed.

The Red Squirrel campsite (01855 811256, www.redsquirrelcampsite.co.uk/) is an excellent base for exploring Glen Coe. Hike into the Lost Valley, reputedly haunted by the ghosts of the slaughtered MacDonald clan, or putter along the length of Glen Etive. The road into Glen Etive is too narrow and winding for tour buses so you can enjoy the landscape undisturbed. Stop for a swim along the way, or just take in the view with a nice cup of tea.

The Clachaig Inn (www.clachaig.com), just a few minutes walk from the Red Squirrel campsite, is the place to relax after a day exploring. The inn serves great food and the Boots Bar has an impressive malt whisky selection with live music to get you dancing once the whisky starts working its magic.

Getting on the road
There are several companies in Scotland tthat hire out VW campervans:
Edinburgh: www.scoobycampers.com, 0131 467 1312
Lochwinnoch, 16 miles west of Glasgow: www.escapecampers.co.uk, 01505 843 198
Dumfries: www.solwaybeetles.co.uk, 0778 968 1739
Evanton, north of Inverness: www.happyhighlandcampers.co.uk, 01349 830 214

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Author:
Jenny McNeely
Traveller type:
Travel Professional
Guide rating:
3
Average: 3 (2 votes)
Total views:
459
First uploaded:
20 September 2009
Last updated:
4 years 44 weeks 6 days 17 hours 2 min 58 sec ago
Destinations featured:
Trip types:
Activity, Adventure, Road Trip
Budget level:
Budget
Free tags / Keywords:
whisky, tour, explore, hike, campervan, road

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Community comments (2)

Rating:
3
0 of 0 people found the following comment helpful.

Great idea, nicely written. Some good tips on where to go, but I think that Scotland is too big and varied for just one guide.

Even given the flexibility that a campervan gives you, it feels like the guide is a bit rushed and crowded. And all those beautiful places deserve photos!

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Rating:
3
0 of 0 people found the following comment helpful.

This is no doubt a useful guide for anyone planning a camping trip to Scotland.

I'm not sure that the guide will inspire anyone who aren't already a cambervan fan, though. I found the recommendations to be skimming the surface a bit, never really getting the feel for any place, and I got no sense at all for the experience of driving through Scotland in a campervan. Why should I go? Why is it preferable to hotels?

It was still an enjoyable read, though.

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