Ditch the car - visit the Knoydart peninsula

By Jill Phillip, a Travel Enthusiast

Read more on Mallaig.

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Go to the Knoydart peninsula to escape from the hustle and bustle of daily life. Take in the scenery while bagging a Munro or explore the Scottish wilderness by boat and train

Forget stressful airport transfers and illogical sat nav instructions: be cool and arrive at your destination by boat. Visit the Knoydart peninsula in North West Scotland, inaccessible by road, and boat is your default mode. It’s remote, stunning, has four Munros and is a haven for walking, diving and photography, but it also offers top class cuisine and is famed for its hospitality, culture and community spirit.

Across the Sound of Sleat from Skye, Knoydart is actually part of the mainland. However, unless you walk, or mountain bike from Kinloch Hourn you need to arrive by sea. Known as the Rough Bounds, it is one of the last real wildernesses in Western Europe. In 1999, the Knoydart Foundation (www.knoydart-foundation.com), a partnership composed of local residents, the Highland Council and the John Muir Trust, was set up to “preserve, enhance and develop Knoydart for the well-being of the environment and its people”. Today, it is a thriving community, home to about 100 residents who welcome visitors to share its rugged beauty and enjoy its relaxed, genuine way of life.

As you can’t drive into Knoydart, why take the car? It is perfectly possible to reach Knoydart by public transport, the most civilised option being the overnight Caledonian sleeper (www.firstscotrail.co.uk). Board at Euston, or stations through the Midlands, and wake up in the southern Highlands. Then breakfast in Fort William before catching the West Highland Line to Mallaig.

Frequently voted one of the top railway journeys in the world, this 42 mile ride takes you past Britain’s highest mountain, deepest loch and shortest river, before reaching its most westerly station. Travel between April and October and the steam engine, Jacobite (www.westcoastrailways.co.uk), will power you across the 21 arch Glenfinnan Viaduct, immortalised in the Harry Potter books, past the monument to the 1745 Jacobite rebellion and alongside the iconic silver sands of Morar, the setting for the films Highlander and Local Hero.

If you have a few minutes to spare, drop into the Mallaig Heritage Centre (www.mallaigheritage.org.uk) beside the station, where the imaginatively presented exhibitions tell the history of the Rough Bounds and show the rapid transformation of Mallaig into a busy fishing port after the railway was completed in 1901.

Head towards the harbour and, keeping to the left, you will arrive at the public steps on the small boat pier. Here you can arrange for a small boat to meet you (www.doune-knoydart.co.uk) to take you on the last leg of the journey, across Loch Nevis to Knoydart. Doune is on a rocky headland on the western edge of the peninsular and the accommodation is run by two couples, Martin and Jane Davies and Liz and Andy Tibbetts and their families. Doune Stone Lodges offer fully catered, comfortable double or twin rooms, en suite toilet, shower and porch, while the Doune Bay Lodge is designed for larger families, clubs, corporate events, and consists of eight rooms, open-plan living area and kitchen.

The setting is idyllic, with unforgettable sunsets behind the Skye Cuillins to the west, and the absence of mobile reception and power-thirsty hairdryers and trouser presses adds positively to its unique ambience. The lodges are effectively and sensitively equipped: warm duvets and invigorating showers - particularly welcome after a bracing day in the hills.

Doune Dining Room (+44 1687 462667) is one of only seven institutions currently holding the Destination Dining Award for providing the best of food in the finest of settings. Everything is home-made, seafood is caught locally and Jane and Liz’s organic gardens provide most of the vegetables and soft fruit. While meat eaters can tuck into locally-produced lamb and venison, my vegetarianism was expertly satisfied, with a sumptuous nut pate and mouth-watering desserts particular highlights, and fully catered means exactly that, with breakfasts, packed lunches and evening meals all included.

Three Corbetts, added to its four Munros make this hill-walking heaven, particularly for those who seek peacefulness and solitude. Ladhar Bheinn, at 1020m (3,346ft) is the highest and most dramatic mountain, although like many peaks on Knoydart, it is difficult to access. Martin and his team are generous with their local knowledge and, by using their boat Mary Doune, it is possible to sail to many mountain approaches.

That said, it is not necessary to go stratospheric to enjoy the beauty of Knoydart. Sailing from Doune, we headed north along the Sound of Sleat with Sandaig Islands clearly visible in the distance. Turning east into Loch Hourn, our progress was observed by some bored looking seals basking in the April sunshine, while Alastair, our knowledgeable skipper, identified Beinn Sgritheall as the snow-clad peak dominating the northern shore.

Scrambling ashore on Barrisdale Bay, it was impossible not to be moved by the still beauty of this sandy inlet. From here to Inverie, the “capital” of Knoydart is a trek of about eight miles through a spectacular mountain landscape. Passing the Barisdale bothy and campsite, the route climbs steadily along the pony path through Mam Barrisdale, until, at the top of the path, the cylindrical outline of Loch an Dubh-Lochain appears on the horizon. From here it is a relaxing stroll along the Inverie river to the Old Forge pub (01687 462267) in the centre of the village.

The Old Forge, the most remote pub in mainland Britain, is much more than just a pub. It has won many accolades for its beers, wines and locally-sourced food and also provides a rewarding coffee and slab of cake, as you relive your walk, climb or dive. But it is also the undoubted hub of the community; the stock of musical instruments in the bar testament to its famed reputation for impromptu entertainment. Its website (www.theoldforge.co.uk), is a treasure trove of local information, advertising local jobs, advising on hill-walking routes and listing local accommodation.

Staying on Knoydart can be as lavish or basic as you want to make it. It is possible to wild camp on the beach, backpack in a bothy or indulge in a luxurious b&b. Match your requirements to the surprisingly wide variety available (www.knoydart-foundation.com and www.barrisdale.com) and forget any excuses for not experiencing this magnificent corner of Britain.

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More information on Ditch the car - visit the Knoydart peninsula:

Author:
Jill Phillip
Traveller type:
Travel Enthusiast
Guide rating:
4
Average: 4 (3 votes)
Total views:
798
First uploaded:
30 September 2009
Last updated:
4 years 5 weeks 23 hours 47 min 58 sec ago
Destinations featured:
Trip types:
Activity, Adventure, Food and Drink
Budget level:
Mid-range, Expensive
Free tags / Keywords:
walking, Rugged scenery, boat trip, rail journey

Jill recommends

Hotels

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(out of 5)
1. Doune Stone Lodges
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2. Doune Bay Lodge
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Community comments (3)

Rating:
4
0 of 0 people found the following comment helpful.

One of the only places in the UK where it's still possible to be more than a day's walk from the nearest road. It's a true wilderness.

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Rating:
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0 of 0 people found the following comment helpful.

I have always wanted to visit Knoydart - this guide just makes me more determined to go!

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Rating:
4
0 of 0 people found the following comment helpful.

This is a very useful guide with a lot of information on how to travel and where to stay. Perhaps more descriptions of the rugged scenery and landscape would provoke readers to want to explore this area more?

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