Cycling the Lochs and Glens of Scotland

By Jill Phillip, a Travel Enthusiast

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Overall rating:4.0 out of 5 (based on 1 vote)
Enjoyable
3
3.0
Useful
5
5.0
Inspirational
3
3.0
Recommended for:
Activity, Eco, Food and Drink, Budget, Mid-range

When exploring the spectacular Trossachs National Park by train and bike, you can have your cake and eat it. In Aberfeldy and Glasgow, reward yourself in some of Scotland's best cafés

Greener and leaner – think pedal power, and no petrol costs – doesn’t have to be meaner. Cycling may be the car-free, guilt-free way of exploring the spectacular Trossachs National Park, one of Scotland’s most beautiful regions – but it also gives you the chance to sample, en route, the best cakes and coffee to balance the calories expended.

Book well in advance, reserve a bike space at the same time (with www.firstscotrail.co.uk) and a single from the Midlands or South-east England to Glasgow can cost as little as £19. The process is user-friendly, far more transparent than the average budget airline - and it disproves some negative preconceptions about public transport and bikes in Britain.

Glasgow, known for its museums, shopping, architecture and café culture, is also a surprisingly cycle-friendly start to the route. Check out www.glasgowcyclemap.info and use it to tap into the city’s dual legacy of disused railways and canal paths. These comprise a traffic-free route that takes you to Loch Lomond in barely 90 minutes from the Squinty Bridge.

Heading west, away from the loch and its coach parties, the gradients steepen through Drymen, towards Aberfoyle, and the beauty of the Lochs and Glens (Sustrans Route 7) becomes obvious as you enter the magical, wooded Trossachs. Cyclists keen to enjoy the braes without the weight of heavily-laden panniers can take advantage of luggage-transporting services such as www.bikeandhike.co.uk.

Cycle touring equals flexibility, allowing a detour to the captivating Loch Katrine. The birthplace of Rob Roy, it also supplies Glasgow’s water – and the system of aqueducts running 34 miles to the city is understandably regarded as a wonder of Victorian engineering. Interestingly, it also freed Glasgow, long notorious for bad housing and poor health, from the scourge of cholera long before any other major British city. In summer, it is possible to combine an 18km circuit of the loch with a steamship tour on the Clyde-built steamship, SS Sir Walter Scott (see www.lochkatrine.com/steamship for details).

The route then shadows the southern shore of the Highland-esque Loch Venachar to Callander, before heading north to Strathyre. There, the Inn at Strathyre (www.innatstrathyre.com) provides a warm welcome, hearty food and regular, impromptu entertainment in the bar – which, for those who want to keep in touch with the wider world, has Wi-fi access. The cosy b&b has a range of double, twin and family rooms and will happily provide packed lunches.

From here the trail follows the old Callander to Oban railway, where your steady ascent may well be monitored by an unimpressed red squirrel. About 10 miles on, the path crosses along another 19th-century engineering marvel, the 60m-high Glen Ogle viaduct, now the exclusive preserve of walkers and cyclists.

From Killin, eastwards along Loch Tay, it’s only a short stretch to Aberfeldy where The Watermill (www.aberfeldywatermill.co.uk) easily wins the prize for best re-fuelling stop en route. Voted Scottish Independent Bookshop of the Year 2006, it has a café that takes its coffee very seriously. Here, you can relax in peace with a book, a newspaper and a tempting selection of cakes.

It’s an easy ride along the pretty Tay Valley to Pitlochry, home of the Festival Theatre and just a 90-minute train journey from Glasgow, where you began. The comfortable and friendly Glasgow Guest House is ideally located between the Burrell Collection and Mackintosh’s House for an Art Lover in the city’s Southside. Cycle to both and treat yourself to a delicious organic coffee and pastry at Tapa (www.tapabakehouse.com), widely regarded as the best coffeehouse and bakery in Glasgow.

Four days, 150 miles, roughly equal expenditure and consumption of calories for £350: it is possible to cut your carbon, stay relatively solvent but still indulge.

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More information on Cycling the Lochs and Glens of Scotland:

Author:
Jill Phillip
Traveller type:
Travel Enthusiast
Guide rating:
4
Average: 4 (1 vote)
Total views:
1122
First uploaded:
29 September 2009
Last updated:
4 years 2 days 4 hours 30 min 20 sec ago
Destinations featured:
Trip types:
Activity, Eco, Food and Drink
Budget level:
Budget, Mid-range
Free tags / Keywords:
culture, cycling, cafes, eco

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Community comments (1)

Rating:
4
0 of 0 people found the following comment helpful.

We like this guide. There's a nice spin to it (the cakes versus exertion angle)and it gives some really useful tips on how to go about exploring the Trossachs without a car. What it slightly lacks is exuberance, which is why it doesn't score quite as highly on the "enjoyable" and "inspirational" ratings.

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