How to get around Naples

Metro Materdei

By Jan Fuscoe, your Naples expert

I write for DK Eyewitness, Fodor's .... Read more

Getting around Naples - my advice

The easiest way to get around Naples is a piedi (walking) as the traffic can be horrendous.

Walking

One of the greatest things about wandering around Naples is that you never know what you'll find. A little street off the main drag might harvest a wonderful church or a tiny trattoria, or perhaps an artisan cheese (or tripe) shop. That said, at night in the less salubrious parts of town, it is not recommended to just wander around - taxis are cheap, just be sure to check that the meter is on when you set off.

Buses

The traffic in Naples means that it's often quicker to walk, but buses are an option for longer distances – crossing town, for instance – and essential if you're heading further afield to, say, Sorrento, Pompeii or the Amalfi Coast. Bus services are mostly run by ANM (www.anm.it) but unless you know Naples well you may find their webpage difficult to follow. Better is to look at Unico Campania's interactive transport network pages (www.unicocampania.it) under 'Maps' where you'll see exactly which bus goes where. 

Unico Napoli (www.unicocampania.it) tickets, valid on all local ANM buses, metro lines and the funicular, must be bought before boarding from a tabacchi or ticket machine at the bus stop/metro or funicular station. Prices went up slightly in April 2011 and a ticket now costs €1.20 and is valid for 90 minutes. A 24-hr ticket costs €3.60 and a weekend (Saturday and Sunday) ticket costs €3. For a longer stay, a monthly ticket, will cost €40. If you're planning on travelling around the coast, invest in a Unico Campania 3T (€18 for a 3-day pass covering transport all along the Amalfi Coast).

The City Sightseeing Napoli bus (www.napoli.city-sightseeing.it) is a fun way of seeing the city. Tickets (€22, €11 for children and €66 for a family) are valid for 24 hours and you can hop on and off whenever you like. There are four routes in Naples, including an art tour and a tour of the Bay of Naples, as well as a welcome new service (not a tour) that will take you to Pompeii/Vesuvius (€10 return, 55-minute journey).

Metro

Naples has a pretty good metro system (www.metro.na.it) that connects up the city well. Linea 1 connects Piazza Dante to Piazza Vanvitelli and then runs out to the suburbs, while Linea 6 runs from Mergellina to Mostra. Tickets for the metro and the funicular (see below) cost €1.20 and last for 90 minutes, but those who are in town for a few days and fancy visiting, say, Sorrento or Amalfi, should invest in the 3-day tourist ticket (€18) which can be used on all the local buses as well as SITA, EAV and alll Circumvesuviana trains (see trains below). Another option is the Artecard (www.artecard.it) which combines admission to sites with travel over three or seven days. An example would be a 3-day 'tutta la regione' card (€27) that gives you access to two sites for free and the third and each subsequent site will be discounted by 50 per cent. See the website to find a card that will suit your travel/tourist needs.

Funicular

There are also four funicular railways that run from Chiaia, Centrale, Mergellina and Montesanto and take you up to Vomero.

Train

Naples has three railway stations: Centrale in Piazza Garibaldi (Circumvesuviana and interchange with Metro); Mergellina, near the port; and Campi Flegrei (Stadio San Paolo, Edenlandia, zoo).

The telephone number for all of these is 89 20 21 and it can be used throughout Italy without a code. Booking a ticket is essential as those travelling without a valid ticket will be fined. Tickets can be booked in advance at the station's booking office or at agencies that display the FS sign (Ferrovie della Stato-Trenitalia). Tickets must be stamped in the yellow machines at the start of the platform to validate them.

Circumvesuviana (0800 53939, www.vesuviana.it) is a narrow-gauge overground railway that serves Oplontis, Pompeii, Herculananeum and Sorrento.

Getting to the islands and the Amalfi Coast

Ferry/hydrofoil: There are a number of ferry and hydrofoil services that regularly leave Molo Beverello (the port of Naples) for the islands of Capri, Ischia and Procida as well as linking towns along the coast of Naples. The smaller port of Mergellina also runs ferry services. The main companies are Alilauro (www.alilauro.it), Caremar (www.caremar.it), MedMar (www.medmargroup.it), Navigazione Libera del Golfo (wwwnavlib.it) and SNAV (www.snav.it).

Metro del Mare (www.metrodelmare.net) is a ferry service that runs from mid-June to early September and links the main coastal towns of Naples (Sorrento, Ercolano) and the Amalfi Coast (Amalfi, Positano) as well as Cilento and the island of Capri.

It's worth noting that the integrated Unico Costiera travel card (www.campania.it) covers travel all over the Amalfi Coast (bus and train) but excluding Capri and Ischia (both islands have separate tickets). Tickets cost €2.40 for a 45-minute journey, €3.60 (90 minutes), €7.20 (24 hours) and €18 (3 days).

Further information

For more general advice on getting around the Neapolitan Riviera, see How to get around Neapolitan Riviera.

For more expert advice on Naples, follow these links: